Benghazi, Culture Wars, Drugs

> Date: Mon, 5 Nov 2012 13:03:21 -0500 (EST)
> From: “Rachel Ehrenfeld, K.D.M. Jensen” > To: rich.kaplan@cox.net
> Subject: Benghazi, Culture Wars, Drugs
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> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ >
> EWI Digest Posting No. 313, November 6, 2012
>
> BENGHAZI:
>
> Jerusalem Post on Benghazi,
>
> What Laser Capability Did Benghazi Team Have?
>
> CULTURE WARS:
>
> Pan-Islamic Superstate,
>
> Egypt Sheikh Says Brotherhood Trying to Please U.S.,
>
> Introducing the Libyan Muslim Brotherhood,
>
> The Muslim Brotherhood from Within,
>
> The Threat Doctrine That Cries ‘Blasphemy’,
>
> The Saudis Are Bulldozing Islam’s Heritage
>
> DRUGS:
>
> Guinea Bissau,
>
> Colombian Drug Lord Caught in Argentina
>
> “People say I’m a drug trafficker,” said Gen. Antonio Injai, right, > the army chief of staff. “Anybody who has the proof, present it!” >
> (See Item 9)
>
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>
> http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL80F8C53F783A1741&feature=plcp >
> To: Friends
>
> From: Ken Jensen, Rachel Ehrenfeld
>
>
> *
>
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> EWI BLOG: Kenneth D.M. Jensen: Benghazi, Culture Wars, Drugs Http://EconWarfare.org
> [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=58psfelab.0.t9m7lelab.wus7micab.3290&ts=S0837&p=Http%3A%2F%2FEconWarfare.org] > BENGHAZI
> Jerusalem Post on Benghazi
> Foreign coverage of Benghazi, apart from the occasional article in the Telegraph
> UK, has been non-existent. Today, we offer one from the Jerusalem Post that runs > counter to the trend.
> What Laser Capability Did Benghazi Team Have?
> Fox’s Jennifer Griffin offers the latest news on the attack, focusing on capabilities
> the United States had in Benghazi that, due to directions from Washington, were > not taken advantage of.
> CULTURE WARS
> It’s difficult to detach the topic of culture wars from that of the Muslim Brotherhood,
> its statements and actions. Therefore, on this occasion, I don’t separate them. > Pan-Islamic Superstate
> Yaakov Lappin links the Muslim Brotherhood’s action in and out of Egypt to the aspiration
> for, if not the caliphate, at least a pan-Islamic superstate. There are steps to > this. Lappin describes the immediate step being taken:
> “Both Hamas and the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood dispute the doctrine of immediate
> jihad pursued by the Salafi jihadis; they appear to prefer instead to focus on consolidating
> their newly found political power before confronting Israel. As the Muslim Brothers
> keep repeating, at least for now, they seem to be planning to seek conflict with
> Israel only after they have completed the Islamization of their societies at home.” > Egypt Sheikh Says Brotherhood Trying to Please U.S.
> Aswat Masriya (Cairo) reports that “Sheikh Hafez Salama said that Egypt does not
> belong to one entity, accusing the Muslim Brotherhood of abandoning the fight to
> implement Sharia (Islamic law) and accusing it of trying to please the United States.
> ‘The Muslim Brotherhood has changed a lot from the past,’ Salama said, arguing that
> Egypt’s most influential Islamist group no longer wishes to see Sharia implemented > and instead wants a civil state.” Salama is a Suez sheikh, fyi. > Introducing the Libyan Muslim Brotherhood
> Writing on Foreign Policy, Mary Fitzgerald has done an interesting piece on Libya’s
> Muslim Brotherhood. Read carefully to understand why the Libyan branch of the movement > hasn’t done nearly as well as it has elsewhere.
> The Muslim Brotherhood from Within
> Writing for Daily Egypt News, Ziad Aki argues that
> “While most of the time we focus on the external dimensions of the Muslim Brotherhood’s
> rule over Egypt, meaning their policies, statements, decisions and directions, we
> do not donate the same amount of attention to the group from within. I believe that
> the way in which the movement is organised from the inside has a lot to do with > their current position within Egyptian politics.”
> Most illuminating is his description of what it takes to become a Muslim brother. > It’s worth repeating at length here:
> “The rigid internal structure of the Muslim Brotherhood is not very common among
> other political movements and groups in Egypt. If at any moment you stopped and
> asked yourself what it takes to become a Muslim Brother, here is the process shortly > outlined.
> “Joining the Muslim Brotherhood is not an easy task; it is a process that takes
> years and years. It is not a matter of filling an application or attending a couple
> of meetings or even donating some money; it is a process that rids you of your individuality
> and turns you into another cog in the a machine, or in the words of Roger Waters, > another brick in the wall.
> “It takes about five to eight years to transform from an aspiring member to a fully
> integrated Muslim Brother. During this period, the loyalty of the aspiring member
> is closely monitored and his dedication to the cause and the doctrine is closely > watched.
> “Local members of the Brotherhood scout for potential candidates in universities,
> usually students who demonstrate significant signs of piety. These members do not
> usually identify themselves as Muslim Brothers, rather they conceal their identity
> to try and build relationships with the potential candidate and be able to assess > his commitment to religion.
> “The Brotherhood also targets the children of the Muslim Brothers, starting their
> recruitment process around the age of 9. If you decide independently that you want
> to join the Brotherhood and you start seeking ways to do that, you need to know
> a member who will probably take you to another man to guide you and teach you. So > like a vampire community, only a Muslim Brother can transform you into one.
> “Age is a crucial factor in the recruitment process; the Brotherhood usually directs
> its recruitment efforts towards young men. If the organisation feels that the potential
> candidate demonstrates sufficient commitment to their ideology, the long process > of actually becoming a Muslim Brother then begins.
> “As soon as you are admitted into the Brotherhood, you become a muhib, a word that
> literally means lover or follower. This phase could last between six months and
> four years depending on the performance and the improvement of the aspiring member.
> During that phase the follower joins a local usra (family) which is a group of four
> to five people that meets regularly and where the piety, morality and ideology of > the aspirant are closely watched.
> “After the leader of the family decides that the follower has shown sufficient piety
> and knowledge of Islamic texts, the candidate is moved to a more advanced phase
> where he becomes a muayyed (supporter). During the ‘supporter’ phase, duties towards
> the organisation must be fulfilled and a curriculum of study completed. Upon finishing > that phase, you are moved to a higher rank and become muntasib (affiliated).
> As soon as you become affiliated, you start donating a portion of your earnings
> to the organisation, usually five to eight per cent. In the ‘affiliated’ phase your
> loyalty and commitment are closely probed. If you satisfy those who monitor you,
> usually over the course of a year, you are then allowed to the phase of muntazim
> or organised brother and you can assume lower levels of leadership. Finally, if
> you pass all the tests that the Brotherhood will subject you to; you are admitted > into the final stage of membership which is ach amil or working brother.
> “This cult-like process is how our current leaders have been formed and how the
> Brotherhood is carefully forming future ones. This quasi-fascist structure where
> your loyalty is always put to question and your personal life is watched at every > moment is the mechanism by which Muslim Brothers are produced. > The Threat Doctrine That Cries ‘Blasphemy’
> Janet Levy, writing for the American Thinker, begins like this:
> “For the past 25 years, the Muslim Brotherhood in North America has been pursuing
> a comprehensive strategy to control what non-Muslims know about Islam. This multi-pronged
> threat doctrine seeks to prohibit open discussion and to abridge free speech. It
> also seeks to curtail education and training given to the military, law enforcement,
> intelligence, and government about the true nature of Islam. Overall, the Brotherhood’s
> agenda seeks to block a fair and critical appraisal of Islamic doctrine, pursue
> a stealth civilizational jihad against the West, and, ultimately, render us impotent > to defend ourselves.
> A review of the Brotherhood’s progress in this effort over the past two decades
> presents a chilling picture of the extent to which our safety and way of life have > been compromised. It serves as a wake-up call for action now.” > And ends like this:
> “It’s evident that the Muslim Brotherhood’s General Strategic Plan for North America
> has achieved great success within the past few decades. Ultimately, the control
> of all knowledge of Islam and the civilizational jihad operation facilitates the
> attack against the West and effectively prevents any counter to Islamic expansionism.
> We are well on our way to being subdued by an enemy that has cleverly silenced > us.”
> I’m afraid that nearly everything Levy says is right on the money. > The Saudis Are Bulldozing Islam’s Heritage
> Damian Thompson of the Telegraph UK offers a bit of (shall we say?) semi-comic relief
> to the culture wars by taking on the Saudis for, seemingly indiscriminately, replacing
> Islamic heritage sties with, well, this and that, from public lavatories to shopping
> malls. Thompson wonders where the outrage is within the Islamic world about all
> this given the excitement caused by Israeli excavations in Jerusalem. There’s > at least one culture war going on within Islam.
> DRUGS
> Guinea Bissau
> The New York Times’ Adam Nossiter expands on this regarding multiply unfortunate > Guinea Bissau:
> “When the army ousted the president here just months before his term was to expire,
> a thirst for power by the officer corps did not fully explain the offensive. But
> a sizable increase in drug trafficking in this troubled country since the military
> took over has raised suspicions that the president’s sudden removal was what amounted > to a cocaine coup.”
> Colombian Drug Lord Caught in Argentina
> AP reports that “Colombia’s President Juan Manuel Santos sent a Twitter message
> overnight crediting his country’s police and Argentine authorities for the capture > of Henry de Jesús López Londoño , also known as ‘Mi Sangre,’ or ‘My Blood’.” > CONTENTS
> BENGHAZI
> ITEM 1: Fred Gedrich: Deadly Statecraft: There must be accountability for Benghazi > and it should start with President Obama.
> http://www.jpost.com/Magazine/Opinion/Article.aspx?id=290122&prmusr=vGyFx8wnu5nh7fgDD%2fTY0R%2ftGf3p%2bMvaPrUYHf7X2WB59NqSJPYJZXT02LqhGLgh
> [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=58psfelab.0.v9m7lelab.wus7micab.3290&ts=S0837&p=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.jpost.com%2FMagazine%2FOpinion%2FArticle.aspx%3Fid%3D290122%26prmusr%3DvGyFx8wnu5nh7fgDD%252fTY0R%252ftGf3p%252bMvaPrUYHf7X2WB59NqSJPYJZXT02LqhGLgh] > ITEM 2: Jennifer Griffin: What laser capability did Benghazi team have?
> http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2012/11/04/what-laser-capability-did-benghazi-team-have/
> [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=58psfelab.0.w9m7lelab.wus7micab.3290&ts=S0837&p=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.foxnews.com%2Fpolitics%2F2012%2F11%2F04%2Fwhat-laser-capability-did-benghazi-team-have%2F] > CULTURE WARS
> ITEM 3: Yaakov Lappin: Muslim Brotherhood Plan Belligerent Pan-Islamic Super-State > Gatestone
> ITEM 4: Aswat Masriya (Cairo): Egypt Sheikh Says Brotherhood Trying to Please U.S.
> http://allafrica.com/stories/201211020931.html [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=58psfelab.0.x9m7lelab.wus7micab.3290&ts=S0837&p=http%3A%2F%2Fallafrica.com%2Fstories%2F201211020931.html] > ITEM 5: Mary Fitzgerald: Introducing the Libyan Muslim Brotherhood
> http://mideast.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2012/11/02/introducing_the_libyan_muslim_brotherhood
> [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=58psfelab.0.y9m7lelab.wus7micab.3290&ts=S0837&p=http%3A%2F%2Fmideast.foreignpolicy.com%2Fposts%2F2012%2F11%2F02%2Fintroducing_the_libyan_muslim_brotherhood] > ITEM 6: Ziad Akl: The Muslim Brotherhood from within
> http://dailynewsegypt.com/2012/11/03/the-muslim-brotherhood-from-within/ [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=58psfelab.0.z9m7lelab.wus7micab.3290&ts=S0837&p=http%3A%2F%2Fdailynewsegypt.com%2F2012%2F11%2F03%2Fthe-muslim-brotherhood-from-within%2F]
> ITEM 7: Damian Thompson: The Saudis are bulldozing Islam’s heritage. Why the silence > from the Muslim world?
> http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/damianthompson/100187644/the-saudis-are-bulldozing-islams-heritage-why-the-silence-from-the-muslim-world/
> [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=58psfelab.0.99m7lelab.wus7micab.3290&ts=S0837&p=http%3A%2F%2Fblogs.telegraph.co.uk%2Fnews%2Fdamianthompson%2F100187644%2Fthe-saudis-are-bulldozing-islams-heritage-why-the-silence-from-the-muslim-world%2F] > ITEM 8: Janet Levy: The Threat Doctrine that Cries ‘Blasphemy’
> http://www.americanthinker.com/2012/11/the_threat_doctrine_that_cries_blasphemy.html
> [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=58psfelab.0.89m7lelab.wus7micab.3290&ts=S0837&p=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.americanthinker.com%2F2012%2F11%2Fthe_threat_doctrine_that_cries_blasphemy.html] > DRUGS
> ITEM 9: Adam Nossiter: Leader Ousted, Nation Is Now a Drug Haven
> http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/02/world/africa/guinea-bissau-after-coup-is-drug-trafficking-haven.html?ref=todayspaper
> [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=58psfelab.0.79m7lelab.wus7micab.3290&ts=S0837&p=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nytimes.com%2F2012%2F11%2F02%2Fworld%2Fafrica%2Fguinea-bissau-after-coup-is-drug-trafficking-haven.html%3Fref%3Dtodayspaper] > ITEM 10: AP: Alleged Colombian Drug Lord Caught in Argentina
> http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204712904578090743636280224.html?mod=WSJ_World_LEFTSecondNews
> [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=58psfelab.0.69m7lelab.wus7micab.3290&ts=S0837&p=http%3A%2F%2Fonline.wsj.com%2Farticle%2FSB10001424052970204712904578090743636280224.html%3Fmod%3DWSJ_World_LEFTSecondNews] > FULL TEXTS
> ITEM 1a: Fred Gedrich: Deadly Statecraft: There must be accountability for Benghazi
> and it should start with President Obama. http://www.jpost.com/Magazine/Opinion/Article.aspx?id=290122&prmusr=vGyFx8wnu5nh7fgDD%2fTY0R%2ftGf3p%2bMvaPrUYHf7X2WB59NqSJPYJZXT02LqhGLgh
> [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=58psfelab.0.v9m7lelab.wus7micab.3290&ts=S0837&p=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.jpost.com%2FMagazine%2FOpinion%2FArticle.aspx%3Fid%3D290122%26prmusr%3DvGyFx8wnu5nh7fgDD%252fTY0R%252ftGf3p%252bMvaPrUYHf7X2WB59NqSJPYJZXT02LqhGLgh] > 11/01/2012 14:12
> It took nearly four years into the Barack Obama presidency to know how the president
> would react when confronted with an unexpected international crisis demanding immediate
> action to save American lives. Americans got their answer when al Qaida-inspired
> terrorists overran and torched the US mission in Benghazi, Libya, killing the US > ambassador and three other Americans.
> The Benghazi attack horrified Obama’s White House and reelection team. For over
> a year, the Obama administration had presented the UN Security Council-approved,
> NATO military operation in Libya as a successful model of international cooperation.
> The achievements of such an operation included freeing Libyans from a tyrant and
> bringing democracy to the people. To further bolster President Obama’s national
> security credentials, they also claimed al Qaida was on the verge of defeat after
> Bin Laden’s killing. In doing so, they forgot the hard lesson of history which shows
> that seeing things as you wish them to be, rather than how they really are, can > be deadly.
> After newly appointed US Ambassador to Libya, Chris Stevens, arrived in country
> on May 22, he reported the situation there as “unpredictable, volatile, and violent.”
> During the post-Gaddafi period and up to the attack which coincided with the anniversary
> of September 11th, the US documented over 200 in-country security incidents. These
> included gunfights and bombings, attacks in Benghazi on the British ambassador,
> the International Red Cross Office, and the US mission. An August 2012 report,
> “Al Qaida in Libya: A Profile,” produced by a Department of Defense counter-terrorism
> office and published by the Library of Congress, further documented the rising al > Qaida threat.
> Benghazi confronted our government with the need to have a more comprehensive strategy
> in place in order to respond to attacks on American interests abroad. Within five
> points, the US government can be better prepared for situations like this in the
> future and can try to rectify the gross negligence that resulted in the tragedy > of Benghazi.
> First, the US should not engage in a military conflict unless US national security
> is threatened and it is approved by the US Congress. This was not the case in Obama’s
> Libyan military intervention. The American system of checks and balances in our
> government between the Legislative branch and the Executive branch should not be
> superseded by a small group of administration officials and foreigners at the > United Nations and elsewhere with varying security interests and agendas.
> Second, the US should have military security details, such as the Marine Corps Embassy
> Security Group, assigned to US overseas missions where there is documented evidence
> of significant danger to American diplomats. Their sheer presence could deter and/or
> repel attacks like Benghazi. The US currently has Marine details in 148 State Department
> posts overseas, except Libya. Inexplicably, the State Department removed a 16-person
> US military security unit over the objections of the late ambassador about a month > before the attack.
> Third, the US should never hesitate to use US military might to save American lives,
> even when the host governments object. US military rapid deployment forces and
> airborne gunships, from US bases in Sigonella, Italy and elsewhere, could have arrived > to Benghazi in less than two hours.
> Fourth, the American people deserve to hear the truth from President Obama. He
> has an obligation to tell the country whether he or any appointed administration > official denied military assistance to those under siege in Benghazi.
> Fifth, an independent investigator should be appointed to examine all aspects of
> the Benghazi attack. The current investigation run by the State Department,and
> touted by the president, will not satisfy many Americans because of conflicting
> interests within the administration. State Department officials like Secretary
> Clinton, UN Ambassador Susan Rice, American Foreign Service Association President
> Susan Johnson (representative of all active and retired Foreign Service Officers)
> and others publicly perpetrated the administration myth that an obscure anti-Muslim > video served as the catalyst for the attack.
> Finally, the situation in Benghazi demanded courage, swiftness, decisiveness, and
> good judgment to save American lives. Sadly, President Obama didn’t display any
> of those qualities on that fateful day, choosing instead to turn his back on pleas
> from under-secured and out-gunned Americans for help. Come election-day, Americans > may turn their backs on him.
> The writer is a foreign policy and national security analyst, and served in the
> Departments of Defense and State, traveling to more than 50 overseas missions on > official US government assignments.
> ITEM 2a: Jennifer Griffin: What laser capability did Benghazi team have? http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2012/11/04/what-laser-capability-did-benghazi-team-have/
> [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=58psfelab.0.w9m7lelab.wus7micab.3290&ts=S0837&p=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.foxnews.com%2Fpolitics%2F2012%2F11%2F04%2Fwhat-laser-capability-did-benghazi-team-have%2F] > Published November 04, 2012
> Sources who have debriefed the team that was at the CIA annex the night of the attack
> in Benghazi say that the CIA operators from the Global Response Staff, or GRS, were
> equipped with Mark 48 machine guns and had two types of laser capability. Each weapon
> had both a “passive” as well as a “visible” laser that could be used against the > Libyan attackers.
> The presence of laser capability on the roof of the CIA annex confirms what Fox
> News sources that night in Benghazi originally said, which is that they had laser
> capability and for 5 hours and 15 minutes were wondering where the usual overhead
> air support was, especially since, according to this source, they radioed from the > annex beginning as early as midnight asking for it.
> The presence of lasers raises more questions about why air support was not sent
> to Benghazi even protectively once it became clear that the fighting had followed > the CIA rescue team back to the annex.
> U.S. military officials say they “thought the fighting was over” after the team > left the consulate and that there was a lull in the fighting.
> Fox News has learned the guns were fitted with PEQ-15 lasers. The “passive” laser
> is not visible to the naked eye but can help team members identify hostile forces
> when the shooter is wearing NODS, or Night Observation Device attached to their
> helmet. The visible laser system places a red dot on the attacker and warns the
> attacker not to shoot, encouraging them to flee the scene. U.S. troops often use
> the visible laser to scare children or other civilians who find themselves in the
> middle of combat activity. When civilians see the laser they often back off in order > not to be shot.
> The GRS team that was present at the CIA annex provided security for the CIA station,
> as they do around the world. They are highly trained in countersurveillance, close
> target reconnaissance and in depth reconnaissance. Enemy fighters have learned in
> Afghanistan and Iraq to use their cell phones to follow or intercept these “passive” > lasers without having night vision or NODS.
> The Annex team also had Ground Laser Designators, or GLD. This kind of laser equipment
> emits code and signal when there is overhead air support, unmanned aerial surveillance, > drones or Spectre gunships, for instance.
> A source present the night of the attack says that the GRS team that was defending
> the annex asked where the air support was at midnight. Former SEALs Tyrone Woods > and Glen Doherty were killed 5 hours and 15 minutes later.
> The military is preparing a timeline from the night of the Benghazi attack and plans
> to outline what assets were available to commanders in the region, including AFRICOM
> commander General Carter Ham, who was visiting Washington, D.C., on September 11 > and was in the Pentagon overseeing the operation that night.
> Pentagon spokesman George Little says, “On the night of the attack on American personnel
> and facilities in Benghazi, there were no armed unmanned aerial vehicles over Libya, > and there were no AC-130s anywhere close.”
> On Thursday, the CIA excluded Fox News from a briefing for a small group of reporters
> in which they provided a timeline from the night of the attack in which they explain
> that at 5:15 a.m. (7 hrs and 28 minutes after the attack on the consulate began)
> five mortars are fired at the annex, three of them striking the roof and killing > Woods and Doherty.
> The CIA told the Washington Post’s David Ignatius that “the rooftop defenders never
> ‘laser the mortars’ as has been reported,” a reference to an earlier Fox News report.
> The CIA added the “defenders have focused their laser sights earlier on several > Libyan attackers, as warnings not to fire.”
> The U.S. military says that two unarmed Predators were overhead Benghazi that night
> and providing one stream of video back to Washington beginning at 11:11 p.m. (1 > hr and 24 minutes) after the attack began.
> U.S. military sources say that the second Predator was not armed even though it
> took off from Sigonella Air Base in Sicily after the attack began to provide back
> up to the first Predator which was at the end of its orbit and running low on fuel.
> US commanders say that in reference to the drones positioned at Sigonella: “Not > all aircraft are armed. Ours are not.”
> According to military sources, Libyan authorities have not given the U.S. military
> permission to fly armed drones over populated areas like Benghazi. However, for
> some time the unmanned aerial drones that have been watching Libya’s chemical weapons > sites did have permission to be armed.
> ITEM 3a: Yaakov Lappin: Muslim Brotherhood Plan Belligerent Pan-Islamic Super-State
> http://gatestoneinstitute.org [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=58psfelab.0.59m7lelab.wus7micab.3290&ts=S0837&p=http%3A%2F%2Fgatestoneinstitute.org] > October 30, 2012 at 4:00 am
> Recent comments by the head of the Muslim Brotherhood [MB], the winner of the recent
> elections in Egypt, and others, provide yet another jolting reminder of the ruling > party’s plans for the Middle East.
> With the presidency under its control, members of the MB apparently believe they
> must oversee a comprehensive process of Islamization of the Egyptian state and
> society, before they can turn their sights on their final goal, the creation of
> a pan-Islamic super-state that will encompass the region, and then wage war on Israel.
> In an October 19 Egyptian Channel One television broadcast, made available by the
> invaluable MEMRI, Egypt’s President can be seen deep in prayer. The prayer session
> included a sermon by Futouh Abd Al-Nabi Mansour, a cleric in charge of religious
> endowment in the Matrouh governorate of northwest Egypt. Mansour called out to
> the worshipers: “O Allah, destroy the Jews and their supporters.” [Note: The call
> takes on anti-Semitic tones rather than hiding behind the usual code word of “Zionists.”
> – the Editor]. The call to destroy the Jews did not disturb Morsi’s prayers. (See
> “Egyptian President Morsi Joins Preacher in Prayer for Dispersal of the Jews,” Middle > East Media Research Institute, Video Clip No. 3614, October 19, 2012)
> Sheikh Mohammed Badie, chairman of the MB, signaled his movement’s intentions, calling
> for a “jihad for the recovery of Jerusalem,” and described religious warfare against > Israel as a “duty for all Muslims.”
> Badie’s comments underscored the disappointing fact that, unlike the old Mubarak
> regime that was a cornerstone of regional stability, the new Islamist-governed
> Egypt opposes peace with Israel and is joining the rejectionist camp of the region’s
> fundamentalist forces, promoting unending hostilities, and seemingly seeking to > lead the radical bloc.
> By issuing calls for jihad, Badie has taken Egypt a step closer toward adopting, > as Egypt’s foreign policy, Hamas and its ideology.
> In declaring that Jerusalem’s conquest “will not be done through negotiations,”
> Badie was effectively repeating Hamas’s rejection of peace talks between the Palestinian > Authority and Israel.
> This stance should come as no surprise: Hamas is, in fact, the Palestinian branch
> of the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood, as stated in Article 2 of the Hamas charter > .
> Badie’s comments are only the latest in a series of warning signs from Egypt. At
> a Muslim Brotherhood election rally held earlier this year, an event attended by
> Mohammed Morsi shortly before he became president, a cleric hailed the Brotherhood’s
> candidate as a leader who would work to ensure that “our capital shall not be Cairo,
> Mecca, or Medina. It shall, Allah willing, be Jerusalem. Our cry shall be: Millions > of martyrs march toward Jerusalem.”
> As Morsi looked on smilingly, the cleric told the crowds that, “We can see how the
> dream of the Islamic Caliphate is being realized, Allah willing, by Dr. Muhammad
> Morsi and his brothers, his supporters, and his political party. We can see how
> the great dream, shared by us all — that of the United States of Arabs …shall,
> Allah willing, be restored. The United States of Arabs will be restored by this > man and his supporters.”
> Although some commentators dismiss Badie as unrepresentative of the Morsi government
> and therefore not to be regarded with particular attention, this could well be a
> potentially lethal mistake, and one which plays into the Brotherhood’s efforts > to deceive Western governments and opinion makers.
> Morsi’s “Freedom and Justice Party,” the Brotherhood’s political entity, proudly
> features interviews with Badie on its website. This working arrangement between
> Badie and Morsi allows Badie to issue frank, ideological statements – utterances > that Morsi could not presently say for fear of losing U.S. financial aid.
> The arrangement is comfortable for both Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood movement.
> The Egyptian president can focus on securing loans for the Egyptian economy while
> making vague, conditional references to maintaining the peace treaty with Israel
> — thereby keeping US aid money coming in — as senior officials from his movement
> can prepare the Egyptian public with a stream of bellicose rhetoric, for the future > severance of its ties with Jerusalem.
> The Muslim Brotherhood has waited for this moment for more than six decades. It
> has spent years creating a strong base of support among Egyptian society, while > waiting for Egypt’s secular autocracy to crumble.
> It patiently gathered followers by creating a network of medical clinics and centers, > providing aid to the needy, and spreading Islamist ideas to the poor.
> It was this network that allowed Morsi to win 52% of the vote in the presidential
> elections, and that paved the way for Islamist parties to win two-thirds of the > Egyptian lower house of parliament.
> Now that the Islamists have secured a majority on the panel tasked with drawing
> up Egypt’s new constitution, it should not surprise anyone that they are proposing > articles that will ensure Egypt’s transition to an Islamist state.
> The proposals being produced by the panel have Egyptian liberals up in arms, and
> helped to fuel the recent violent clashes between the supporters and opponents > of Morsi in Cairo.
> The Islamist panel members are seeking to impose the strict enforcement of Sharia
> law in the constitution. The finalized draft will be put to a national referendum,
> and, if passed, will mark another milestone in the transformation of Egypt into > a hardline Sunni state.
> These developments have a direct bearing on regional security. Hamas in Gaza is
> greatly encouraged by the Islamist ascendency in Egypt, and is expecting Cairo to
> be its principle future patron, in the place of Iran and the crumbling Syrian regime.
> Meanwhile, Egyptian security forces in the Sinai Peninsula are failing to take sufficient
> action against the mushrooming Salafi jihadi groups – the same elements that are > increasing their presence in the Gaza Strip.
> The ongoing rocket attacks and cross-border infiltrations by al-Qaeda-inspired elements
> in Gaza and Sinai are forcing Israel to take action in the Strip, thereby raising
> the overall chances of a conflict with Hamas. Should Hamas become involved in a
> new major conflict with Israel, that could trigger a further deterioration with
> Egypt – a situation which, in the short-term future, Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood > would prefer to avoid.
> Both Hamas and the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood dispute the doctrine of immediate
> jihad pursued by the Salafi jihadis; they appear to prefer instead to focus on
> consolidating their newly found political power before confronting Israel. As the
> Muslim Brothers keep repeating, at least for now, they seem to be planning to seek
> conflict with Israel only after they have completed the Islamization of their societies > at home.
> ITEM 4a: Aswat Masriya (Cairo): Egypt Sheikh Says Brotherhood Trying to Please U.S.
> http://allafrica.com/stories/201211020931.html [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=58psfelab.0.x9m7lelab.wus7micab.3290&ts=S0837&p=http%3A%2F%2Fallafrica.com%2Fstories%2F201211020931.html] > 1 NOVEMBER 2012
> Sheikh Hafez Salama said that Egypt does not belong to one entity, accusing the
> Muslim Brotherhood of abandoning the fight to implement Sharia (Islamic law) and > accusing it of trying to please the United States.
> The prominent veteran added on television that the reason he criticizes Egypt’s
> newly-elected president is that the people must call a ruler on his mistakes to > prevent him from turning into a pharaoh.
> “Especially when January 25 was awakened to correct the wrongdoings of the past > 60 years”, Salama explained.
> “The Muslim Brotherhood has changed a lot from the past”, Salama said, arguing that
> Egypt’s most influential Islamist group no longer wishes to see Sharia implemented > and instead wants a civil state.
> “I will be in the frontlines because Islam is my target”, the prominent Suez Sheikh > will participate in next Friday’s protest.
> He slammed President Mohamed Mursi’s referral to Israel’s president as “dear friend”, > insisting that he wishes no dependence on America or any other country.
> ITEM 5a: Mary Fitzgerald: Introducing the Libyan Muslim Brotherhood http://mideast.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2012/11/02/introducing_the_libyan_muslim_brotherhood
> [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=58psfelab.0.y9m7lelab.wus7micab.3290&ts=S0837&p=http%3A%2F%2Fmideast.foreignpolicy.com%2Fposts%2F2012%2F11%2F02%2Fintroducing_the_libyan_muslim_brotherhood] > Friday, November 2, 2012 – 1:24 PM
> Everything about the scene in the white marquee erected in Tripoli’s Mina as-Shaab
> waterside quarter would have been unthinkable until last year. For a start, this
> was an open political gathering of some 500 Libyans in a country where, in the
> past, clandestine meetings of five people could land all concerned in jail. Not
> only that, those assembled under the billowing tent were members of one of Libya’s
> most vilified opposition groups for most of Qaddafi’s 42 years in power: the Muslim
> Brotherhood. All over the Libyan capital billboards emblazoned with the movement’s
> green insignia featuring a Quran over crossed swords and the slogan “Make Ready” > advertised the event.
> The 10-day program of lectures, seminars, and cultural activities headlined “Arab
> Spring: Opportunities and Challenges” may have seemed innocuous but for the leadership
> of the Libyan Muslim Brotherhood, it was an important step in their efforts to win
> friends and influence people after decades of demonization under Qaddafi. Many admit
> to still feeling bruised by the poor performance of their affiliated Justice and
> Construction Party (JCP) in elections for Libya’s 200-strong national congress
> in July. The JCP, founded in March and led by Mohammed Sawan, a Muslim Brotherhood
> member who spent years in Qaddafi’s jails, garnered just 17 out of the 80 seats
> allocated for parties. Its lackluster showing bucked the trend which had seen Islamist
> parties make sweeping electoral gains following the toppling of dictators in neighboring > Tunisia and Egypt.
> “This is like a coming out event for us,” said one long-standing Muslim Brotherhood
> member as they watched visitors file past for the opening ceremony. “We are introducing
> ourselves to the wider society and showing people that we are not something to be > frightened of.”
> I was reminded of the task they face earlier that day when I saw the reaction of
> my driver Riad, a young Tripolitanian who studied economics at university and dreams
> of moving to Europe, to billboards which had been defaced because they advertised
> college courses with pictures of women dressed for a graduation ceremony. The women’s
> faces had been crossed out with black paint. It is not the first time this has happened
> in Tripoli. In the run-up to the July elections, posters belonging to several women
> candidates were vandalized, their faces either cut out or daubed with paint. Suspicion
> fell on Libya’s increasingly assertive Salafists, who constitute some 25 members
> of the national congress — most of them elected as individual candidates — and
> wield considerable power on the street because they are prominent in several of
> the militias that emerged during the revolution. But Riad had another theory. “This
> is Ikhwan [Muslim Brotherhood],” he exclaimed angrily when he saw the billboards. > “These are crazy Ikhwan ideas and this is why they are not popular in Libya.”
> At one side of the marquee, children ran around a brightly-colored play area. In
> another section, delegates browsed through stalls selling books, DVDs, and CDs.
> The merchandise on offer was diverse: works by Hassan al-Banna, who founded the
> Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt in 1928, ideologue Sayyid Qutb, and popular Saudi cleric
> Salman al-Awda, were stacked high alongside biographies of Steve Jobs, MBA guides,
> self-help titles, and pastel-covered Danielle Steele novels translated into Arabic.
> Under fluttering Libyan tricolors, attendees stood ram-rod straight as the opening
> bars of the pre-Qaddafi national anthem blared from loudspeakers. Women, most wearing
> headscarves, a handful in black niqab, took their seats on one side of the marquee.
> Among the men on the other side were some of the new Libya’s most recognizable faces,
> including Nizar Kawan, a dapper Amazigh (or Berber) in his 30s elected to the national
> congress as an individual candidate. In many respects, Kawan illustrates the conundrum
> faced by the Muslim Brotherhood as well as a possible way out. Clean-shaven and
> sharp-suited, Kawan was an opposition spokesman during last year’s revolution and
> a regular fixture on TV, though most Libyans would not have been aware of his Muslim
> Brotherhood background. “When we tell people who have suspicions about the [Muslim
> Brotherhood] that Nizar Kawan is a member, they are surprised and their minds change,”
> one member of his election team told me as they canvassed a lower middle class Tripoli > neighborhood in June.
> Also in attendance for the opening speech of Bashir Kabti, selected as president
> of Libya’s Muslim Brotherhood at a conference in Benghazi last November, were Mahmoud
> Abdelaziz Warfalli, a gregarious former TV presenter and Brotherhood member elected
> as an individual national congress candidate in the hardscrabble Abu Salim district
> of Tripoli, and well-known figures from Libya’s Islamist firmament including Sami
> al-Saadi, a former leader of the now defunct Libyan Islamic Fighting Group whose
> Umma al-Wasat party holds two seats in the national congress. Saadi has been nominated > as minister for the martyrs and missing in Libya’s new government.
> Dressed in a suit and the traditional red felt hat known as a shanna in Libya, Kabti
> took to the stage. Much of his address echoed the campaign platform of the JCP,
> including its vision of Libya as a democratic, civil state with an “Islamic frame
> of reference.” Libyan Islamists, when pushed as to what exactly they mean by this,
> tend to define it as meaning that no law passed in the nascent state would contradict > Islam.
> Kabti told the crowd that the national congress’ list of priorities should be the
> immediate formation of proper national security forces, the disbanding of Libya’s
> constellation of militias, and the building of political and judicial institutions.
> Kabti also talked about foreign intervention — a hot topic here as Libyans speculate
> on whether the United States will retaliate for the September attack on its Benghazi
> consulate which claimed the lives of the U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens and
> three other Americans. Libya’s sovereignty should be respected by the international
> community, Kabti told the gathering, before declaring that no country has the right > to interfere in Libya’s internal affairs.
> Kabti’s speech was spliced with references to past suffering and sacrifice. The
> notion of sacrifice is central to the Libyan Muslim Brotherhood’s idea of itself.
> The movement experienced severe repression under Qaddafi — members were referred
> to as “wayward dogs” and many were executed or jailed. Several figures in the current
> leadership were incarcerated in Abu Salim, the infamous Tripoli prison into which
> thousands of Libyan dissidents vanished and some 1,200 were massacred by regime
> forces in 1996. When the JCP chose to launch its election campaign at the now deserted
> jail in June, the symbolism could not have been more obvious. The recent marquee
> event in Tripoli featured prominently displayed montages of blurry snapshots taken
> in Abu Salim’s crowded cells. One veteran member pointed out whom among the hollow-eyed, > bearded men had survived and who had perished.
> Other members of the Libyan Muslim Brotherhood were forced into long spells in exile,
> returning during last year’s revolution from Libyan diaspora outposts in Britain,
> Switzerland, Canada, Ireland, and the United States. Kabti, whose background is > in accountancy, spent more than three decades living in California.
> “People still see the Brotherhood through the eyes of Qaddafi,” Kabti says during
> a lull between speeches. “He spread lies about us not only in Libya but in other
> countries as well. He misinformed people that the Brotherhood are extremists and
> don’t believe in equality between men and women … We were not able to explain
> our position because our members were persecuted and the Libyan people started to > believe his propaganda.”
> Majda Fallah, one of two women on the 25-person decision-making shura council of
> the Libyan Muslim Brotherhood, says she has tried to correct some of the negative
> impressions of the movement among her fellow national congress representatives.
> Fallah, a paediatrician who joined the Muslim Brotherhood while living in Ireland,
> was elected in the affluent Hay Andalus district of Tripoli. She is one of nine
> Brotherhood members in the national congress, seven of whom were elected as JCP
> members and two, Nizar Kawan and Mahmoud Abdelaziz Warfalli, as individual candidates.
> “When I tell people in the congress I am from the [Muslim Brotherhood] and they
> hear our views as opposed to what they thought were our views, they are taken aback,”
> Fallah says. “Several have admitted to me that they realize now that they thought > about us in the wrong way.”
> Three months ago Libya’s Muslim Brotherhood registered itself as non-governmental
> organization (NGO) as part of efforts to put down roots in Libyan society just as
> the movement has done over decades in Egypt and other parts of the region. Leaders
> say they do not have exact figures but membership is believed to have doubled over > the past year.
> “We registered as a civil society organization to ensure we are legally known and
> recognized by the government so we can conduct our activities freely under its permission,”
> explains Fallah. “We want to be a part of the community. The time of being a secret,
> underground organization is in the past. We are part of the Libyan people, part
> of Libyan society. We want to work through the people in areas such as education, > welfare, culture and youth in order to improve our society as a whole.”
> Abdel Latif Karmous, an urbane professor at Tripoli University and head of the Libyan
> Muslim Brotherhood’s shura council, believes registering as a non-governmental organization > will also help it differentiate itself from the JCP.
> “It makes clear that the party is separate from the Brotherhood because lots of
> people say the party is the Brotherhood which is not the case. The JCP is a different
> organization. Unfortunately the JCP has been damaged by its association with the > Brotherhood because of Qaddafi’s propaganda against us.”
> According to Karmous, the movement is building a database of Libya’s poor and needy
> to help coordinate welfare program, in addition to establishing training and employment > projects for under-educated youth with few prospects.
> “People need to know what the Brotherhood is about because there is a lot of ignorance
> about who we are. They mix us up with fundamentalists, the kind of people who do
> this kind of thing,” he says, pointing at the pile of rubble that was once Tripoli’s
> picturesque Sha’ab mosque until Salafists demolished it in August because it contained
> Sufi shrines. “This is what makes people think negative things about Islamists.
> Even if they have a different opinion about the shrines and the graves in the mosque,
> this destruction is not the way. You should instead educate people as to what is > right and what is wrong.”
> I tell Karmous about my driver Riad blaming the Muslim Brotherhood for the defacing > of billboards featuring women earlier that day.
> Karmous rolls his eyes. “This misunderstanding is down to these Salafists who do
> such things — they are distorting the picture of the Islamists in Libya. People
> think they are the same as the Brotherhood but in fact they are the biggest enemies > for us.
> “Qaddafi left the Salafists alone because they were not interested in politics and
> therefore he did not see them as a threat. The Muslim Brotherhood, however, were
> educated and willing to engage in a political struggle so he tried to damage our > image.”
> Some posters advertising the Muslim Brotherhood’s 10-day event at Tripoli’s harbor
> were torn down. Karmous blames Salafists. “Some of them really hate us — they think > we are not even Muslims, that we are somehow deviating from the true path.”
> Bashir Kabti and many other leadership figures believe much of the movement’s image
> problem in Libya is down to fact it has does not have a TV channel “Many other Libyan
> channels are working against the Brotherhood, trying to put all the Islamists in
> one box. When people bring weapons to the street to demand sharia, these channels
> say “This is Ikhwan” and they say the same when people destroy the Sufi mosques,
> graves, and shrines. It is very difficult to challenge this when we have no TV > channel to out our message across.”
> Abdalla Shamia, a professor of economics at Benghazi university who held the economics
> portfolio in the opposition National Transitional Council during the revolution,
> says it will take time to improve the image of the organization he joined as a
> student in the United States. Shamia was one of some 150 Brotherhood members rounded > up by the regime in the late 1990s. He spent eight years in Abu Salim.
> “We are trying hard now to clear this picture but it needs lots of work. If you
> look at Facebook, there are lots of people saying bad things about us: that we are
> Machiavellian, that we have a foreign agenda, that we are only following Egypt and
> want to bring the country to an unknown destination. All of that has an effect.”
> There is another reason cited by Libyans who dislike the Muslim Brotherhood and
> that is that in the latter years of Qaddafi’s rule, the movement was viewed as having
> compromised with the regime. Former prisoners like Shamia find this particularly
> painful because part of that rapprochement, steered by Qaddafi’s son Saif al-Islam,
> was the release from jail of people like him. The Muslim Brotherhood boycotted the
> first Libyan opposition conference in London in 2005 which called for overthrowing
> the regime at a time Qaddafi was mending his relationship with the West. Many from > other opposition groupings still speak bitterly about this.
> “We had been jailed, tortured, and forced into exile by the regime but yes, we later
> decided to try to work for reform and try to utilize the small space of tolerance
> we were given at that time,” says Shamia. “We thought we could ease some of the
> tension and that doing something which was better than nothing. We cannot deny that
> we did these things but we did it for the sake of reform and we did it without praising > the regime. We did it for Libya.”
> Mary Fitzgerald is the Irish Times foreign affairs correspondent. She is currently
> researching Libya’s Islamist landscape for a forthcoming book. Follow her on Twitter: > @MaryFitzgerldIT.
> ITEM 6a: Ziad Akl: The Muslim Brotherhood from within http://dailynewsegypt.com/2012/11/03/the-muslim-brotherhood-from-within/
> [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=58psfelab.0.z9m7lelab.wus7micab.3290&ts=S0837&p=http%3A%2F%2Fdailynewsegypt.com%2F2012%2F11%2F03%2Fthe-muslim-brotherhood-from-within%2F] > November 3, 2012
> No other political group or movement has received the same attention or has had
> the same impact on Egyptian politics as the Muslim Brotherhood, since the ousting
> of Mubarak until now. The Brotherhood became an everyday reality for Egyptians.
> We wake up to the statements of its leaders, we follow the news of its significant
> figures and we support, oppose or simply feel indifferent towards our president
> who belongs to the Brotherhood. There is a daily interaction that takes place between
> every Egyptian and the Muslim Brotherhood. Whether we like it or not, the Muslim > Brotherhood shapes post-revolutionary Egypt.
> While most of the time we focus on the external dimensions of the Muslim Brotherhood’s
> rule over Egypt, meaning their policies, statements, decisions and directions, we
> do not donate the same amount of attention to the group from within. I believe that
> the way in which the movement is organised from the inside has a lot to do with > their current position within Egyptian politics.
> The rigid internal structure of the Muslim Brotherhood is not very common among
> other political movements and groups in Egypt. If at any moment you stopped and
> asked yourself what it takes to become a Muslim Brother, here is the process shortly > outlined.
> Joining the Muslim Brotherhood is not an easy task; it is a process that takes years
> and years. It is not a matter of filling an application or attending a couple of
> meetings or even donating some money; it is a process that rids you of your individuality
> and turns you into another cog in the a machine, or in the words of Roger Waters, > another brick in the wall.
> It takes about five to eight years to transform from an aspiring member to a fully
> integrated Muslim Brother. During this period, the loyalty of the aspiring member
> is closely monitored and his dedication to the cause and the doctrine is closely > watched.
> Local members of the Brotherhood scout for potential candidates in universities,
> usually students who demonstrate significant signs of piety. These members do not
> usually identify themselves as Muslim Brothers, rather they conceal their identity
> to try and build relationships with the potential candidate and be able to assess > his commitment to religion.
> The Brotherhood also targets the children of the Muslim Brothers, starting their
> recruitment process around the age of 9. If you decide independently that you want
> to join the Brotherhood and you start seeking ways to do that, you need to know
> a member who will probably take you to another man to guide you and teach you. So > like a vampire community, only a Muslim Brother can transform you into one.
> Age is a crucial factor in the recruitment process; the Brotherhood usually directs
> its recruitment efforts towards young men. If the organisation feels that the potential
> candidate demonstrates sufficient commitment to their ideology, the long process > of actually becoming a Muslim Brother then begins.
> As soon as you are admitted into the Brotherhood, you become a muhib, a word that
> literally means lover or follower. This phase could last between six months and
> four years depending on the performance and the improvement of the aspiring member.
> During that phase the follower joins a local usra (family) which is a group of four
> to five people that meets regularly and where the piety, morality and ideology of > the aspirant are closely watched.
> After the leader of the family decides that the follower has shown sufficient piety
> and knowledge of Islamic texts, the candidate is moved to a more advanced phase
> where he becomes a muayyed (supporter). During the “supporter” phase, duties towards
> the organisation must be fulfilled and a curriculum of study completed. Upon finishing > that phase, you are moved to a higher rank and become muntasib (affiliated).
> As soon as you become affiliated, you start donating a portion of your earnings
> to the organisation, usually five to eight per cent. In the “affiliated” phase your
> loyalty and commitment are closely probed. If you satisfy those who monitor you,
> usually over the course of a year, you are then allowed to the phase of muntazim
> or organised brother and you can assume lower levels of leadership. Finally, if
> you pass all the tests that the Brotherhood will subject you to; you are admitted > into the final stage of membership which is ach amil or working brother.
> This cult-like process is how our current leaders have been formed and how the Brotherhood
> is carefully forming future ones. This quasi-fascist structure where your loyalty
> is always put to question and your personal life is watched at every moment is the > mechanism by which Muslim Brothers are produced.
> Now, is it any wonder that all Muslim Brothers sound the same? Is it surprising
> that they all argue in the same way, share the same ideas and are obsessed with
> listening to their own voices? If for years your loyalty has been directed towards
> one entity, the Brotherhood and its ideology, can you be loyal to anything else?
> The Muslim Brotherhood is an organisation that tattoos your soul, molds your mind,
> brands your ideas and at every moment suppresses the free play of your powers. This > is the Muslim Brotherhood from within, this is where our leaders come from!
> ITEM 7a: Damian Thompson: The Saudis are bulldozing Islam’s heritage. Why the silence
> from the Muslim world? http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/damianthompson/100187644/the-saudis-are-bulldozing-islams-heritage-why-the-silence-from-the-muslim-world/
> [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=58psfelab.0.99m7lelab.wus7micab.3290&ts=S0837&p=http%3A%2F%2Fblogs.telegraph.co.uk%2Fnews%2Fdamianthompson%2F100187644%2Fthe-saudis-are-bulldozing-islams-heritage-why-the-silence-from-the-muslim-world%2F] >
> he House of Saud
>
> Damian Thompson is Editor of Telegraph Blogs and a columnist for the Daily Telegraph.
> He was once described by The Church Times as a “blood-crazed ferret”. He is on Twitter
> as HolySmoke. His new book is called The Fix: How addiction is invading our lives > and taking over your world.
> November 2nd, 2012
> Imagine that the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem – the traditional site
> of the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus – has been taken over by Cromwellian
> Puritans. The new owners of the shrine plan to send bulldozers in, replacing the
> old church with a monstrous building resembling a concrete spaceship. This is so
> pilgrims can pray without being distracted by “superstitious” icons. Also, the Old > City will be buried under hotels that make Vegas look like Venice.
> It wouldn’t happen, would it? Christians would fight to the death to preserve Jerusalem.
> So would Jews and Muslims. And, for once, they’d have the support of secular politicians
> and scholars, horrified by the prospect of an act of cultural vandalism unprecedented > in modern times.
> Unprecedented until now, that is. The long-cherished ambition of Saudi Arabia’s
> ruling Wahhabi sect to smash up the ancient buildings of Mecca and Medina is nearing > fruition.
> In Mecca, the house of one of Mohammed’s wives has been demolished to make space
> for public lavatories. His birthplace may disappear, too, as part of King Abdullah’s
> scheme to complement the skyscrapers and shopping malls with a Grand Mosque fashioned > from the same materials as a multi-storey car park in Wolverhampton.
> As for Islam’s second holiest place, the city of Medina, a recent article by Jerome
> Taylor in the Independent revealed a megalomaniac plan to pull down three 7th-century
> mosques. Taylor added: “Ten years ago, a mosque which belonged to the Prophet’s
> grandson was dynamited. Pictures of the demolition that were secretly taken and > smuggled out of the kingdom showed the religious police celebrating.”
> Only a small minority of the world’s billion Muslims are Wahhabis, despite the tens
> of billions of petrodollars spent by the Saudis propagating their creed. (Bosnia,
> for example, is now littered with Saudi-style mosques, replacing the graceful Ottoman
> architecture that Wahhabis detest.) Many pilgrims to Mecca are revolted by the marriage
> of Puritanism and greed they find there. Yet protests are scattered and muted. Why?
> One answer is that the House of Saud, though widely hated, is also feared: its wealth
> and terrorist connections make it unlikely that, say, a Pakistani politician would > speak openly about the desecration of the Hajj.
> The West can hardly complain about such gutlessness: this year’s Hajj exhibition
> at the British Museum was creepily sanitised – no mention of bulldozers or the
> 2,000ft clock tower built right next to the Kaaba, the black cube-shaped building > that is the centrepiece of Islamic devotions.
> But what sticks in the craw is the hypocrisy of Muslims who throw a fit if Israeli
> archaeologists carry out non-intrusive work underneath the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem,
> “Islam’s third holiest place”, as we’re constantly reminded. Such anger would be
> more convincing if the first and second holy sites weren’t being ploughed up by
> a police state. Likewise, are cartoons of Mohammed really more offensive than reducing > the remains of his life to rubble?
> As one Middle East expert put it to me: “Jews disturbing the Dome of the Rock fits
> into an anti-Western narrative, so Muslims can cope with that. The Saudi destruction
> of Mecca doesn’t fit into that narrative, and so there’s virtual silence.” Something
> worth bearing in mind, perhaps, when you wonder why the murder of Muslims by Muslims > in Darfur or Syria provokes only limited outrage in the Islamic world. > Polly’s praise has a hollow ring
> Dear Polly Toynbee was in such a tizzy over the EU in yesterday’s Guardian, trying
> to reconcile her support for Labour’s new line with her ferocious Europhilia. I’ll
> spare you the details of her contortions, except to say that she ended up by praising
> the one Blairite minister who had been properly “tireless” in his support of the
> European Union: Denis MacShane. That’s the same Denis MacShane MP who resigned
> yesterday after being found guilty of tirelessly submitting 19 false invoices for
> “research and translation” services. As Polly says, a man truly in communion with > the spirit of Brussels.
> Vicars with a satanic side
> “An ex-Satanist returns to the Catholic Church,” read a headline on a US website
> this week. Alas, it was just about some woman who’d given up astrology, surely > the realm of the feeble-minded rather than of Devil-worshippers.
> As it happens, I do know a Christian who used to be a Satanist punk rocker. He’s
> now an Anglican vicar and a jolly good one, so I won’t embarrass him by naming > him.
> Mention of Satan and vicars always reminds me of “The Daemons”, my favourite Jon
> Pertwee Doctor Who story, in which Roger Delgado’s Master poses as the Rev Mr Magister.
> He strikes me as your typical Low Church country parson – until, that is, he retires
> to the crypt to conduct black magic rubrics with distinctly Anglo-Catholic flamboyance. > A sorry state of affairs
> Here’s a contender for most humiliating apology of the year: a 540-word mea culpa
> issued to Lord Ashcroft by Dr Éoin Clarke, whose boring and sanctimonious blog “The
> Green Benches” is devoted to exposing the wickedness of Conservative health policy.
> Dr Clarke has been forced to say sorry on five separate counts, including wrongly
> suggesting that Ashcroft donated money to the Tory party in order to increase the > use of agency staff in the NHS.
> Incidentally, we’re not talking about a GP blogger who was too busy to check his
> facts. The only house calls Dr Clarke is qualified to make are to people urgently
> seeking info on Irish women’s history, the subject of his PhD. As I’ve noted before,
> Clarke is so proud of his doctorate that he even calls himself “@DrEoinClarke” on > Twitter. Bless.
> Incidentally, how do you pronounce his name? Says my Gaelic expert: “It’s basically > ‘Eeyore’, but with just a hint of the click sound made by Xhosa tribesmen.” > The plot thickens
> How very, very odd. We learnt this week that the Slimming World All-Party Parliamentary
> Group, which allows Westminster politicians to discuss “weight management”, is being
> wound up. The reason given: a fall in membership. Hmm. Call me a conspiracy theorist,
> but why have the numbers dropped off since 2010? Might it be politically disadvantageous,
> shall we say, for an ambitious Tory MP to show too much interest in the subject > of double chins?
> I seek out my Deep Throat in the Downing Street kitchens. At the mention of the
> words “Slimming World” she raises a knowing eyebrow. “You’ll have to do your own > research,” she says. “All I can tell you is: follow the custard.”
> ITEM 8a: Janet Levy: The Threat Doctrine that Cries ‘Blasphemy’ http://www.americanthinker.com/2012/11/the_threat_doctrine_that_cries_blasphemy.html
> [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=58psfelab.0.89m7lelab.wus7micab.3290&ts=S0837&p=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.americanthinker.com%2F2012%2F11%2Fthe_threat_doctrine_that_cries_blasphemy.html] > November 4, 2012
> For the past 25 years, the Muslim Brotherhood in North America has been pursuing
> a comprehensive strategy to control what non-Muslims know about Islam. This multi-pronged
> threat doctrine seeks to prohibit open discussion and to abridge free speech. It
> also seeks to curtail education and training given to the military, law enforcement,
> intelligence, and government about the true nature of Islam. Overall, the Brotherhood’s
> agenda seeks to block a fair and critical appraisal of Islamic doctrine, pursue
> a stealth civilizational jihad against the West, and, ultimately, render us impotent > to defend ourselves.
> A review of the Brotherhood’s progress in this effort over the past two decades
> presents a chilling picture of the extent to which our safety and way of life have > been compromised. It serves as a wake-up call for action now. > Background
> The General Strategic Plan for the Muslim Brotherhood in North America, written
> and adopted in 1987, established the grand mission for Muslims as a mandatory civilizational
> jihad against the West, led and directed by the Brotherhood. The stated goal was
> to establish Islam as “victorious over all other religions.” Specific steps were
> laid out in the document to bring about a global Islamic state under sharia, or > Islamic doctrine.
> The Brotherhood’s strategic plan is buttressed by the Islamic doctrine of al wala
> wa al bara, which requires Muslims to feel enmity toward non-Muslims (upheld by
> taqiyya, or deception) and exhibit loyalty to the umma, or the Muslim community.
> It embodies the stealth principles of Sun Tzu’s ancient Chinese war doctrine:
> “[s]ubduing an enemy without force is best” and “[a]ll warfare is based on deception.” > Stopping military and government training
> To control what is known about Islam and to block education and training to law
> enforcement and government, the Muslim Brotherhood has developed well-placed inside-influence
> operators who wield considerable power with high-level officials and can set policy.
> For example, in 2008, Stephen Coughlin, a lawyer and top expert on Islamic doctrine,
> was cashiered as a government contractor for the Joint Chiefs of Staff at the Pentagon.
> Coughlin had lectured at the Navy War College and the Marine Corp War College,
> as well as briefed members of Congress, senior staff at the Department of Defense,
> government officials, and law enforcement and intelligence officers. His departure
> was an orchestrated campaign undertaken by an Egyptian-American Muslim, Hesham Islam,
> who, after 20 years in the U.S. Navy, had become a senior adviser and admired confidant > to then-Deputy Secretary of Defense Gordon England.
> Islam was welcomed into England’s inner circle despite his close ties to the Islamic
> Society of North America (ISNA), a Muslim Brotherhood front group and an unindicted
> co-conspirator in the Hamas terrorist funding trial. Islam regularly attended ISNA
> events and hosted the organization at the Pentagon. From his position as a well-placed
> insider, Islam was able to use his relationship with the deputy secretary to label
> Coughlin “extreme” and “a Christian zealot with a poison pen,” even though the veracity
> and scholarship of Coughlin’s lectures were deemed impeccable throughout his chain
> of command. Eventually, Islam succeeded in having Coughlin removed, effectively
> silencing him and removing the benefit of Coughlin’s expertise for military personnel.
> A more recent instance of blocking military and government officials from learning
> the truth about Islamic doctrine was the removal from training responsibilities
> of Lieutenant Colonel Matthew Dooley from the Joint Forces Staff College in Norfolk,
> VA. Although Dooley’s course materials on radical Islam had been previously approved,
> they were recast as “offensive to Muslims” and critical of Islam after complaints > came to the White House from various Islamic influence groups.
> The complaining groups included two unindicted co-conspirators in the Hamas funding
> trial — ISNA, again, and the Council on American Islamic Relations (CAIR). Dooley
> was publicly excoriated, fired as an instructor, and given a negative evaluation,
> placing the future of his military career in jeopardy. Finally, all materials critical
> of Islam were scrubbed from military training, even though much of the training
> materials referenced Islamic texts themselves, as well as commentary from highly > esteemed Muslim clerics.
> In this way, for lack of adequate training and education, our military officers
> and other government employees are ultimately rendered impotent to fight the enemy, > unaware of the threat to national security posed by Islam. > Invoking “Islamophobia” and “Blasphemy”
> Another key tactic cited in the Brotherhood’s strategic plan is to prevent infidels
> from learning the truth about Islam by controlling how Islamic doctrine is discussed
> and the language used to describe Islam and Muslims. This method is effectively
> aided by the West’s culture of multiculturalism, in which charges of prejudice > and racism — like “Islamophobia” — trump all offenses.
> The all too convenient charge of “Islamophobia” has been proclaimed when non-Muslims
> have critically evaluated the tenets of Islam, denounced terrorist activities, called
> attention to inappropriate or threatening behavior, denied requests for accommodations
> beyond what is customary and normal, depicted Mohammed in unflattering ways, or
> even quoted directly from Islamic scriptures. This dissembling or disingenuous
> focus on “Islamophobia,” when none exists in the U.S. (according to an FBI study
> on religious hate crimes), obfuscates the real danger of jihad and Islamic supremacism.
> It lulls the general populace and renders it helpless to defend itself against > the real Islamic threat.
> A parallel move, used when actual Islamic terrorist actions have been taken, is
> to shift the blame for those actions onto non-Muslims. Thus, those who have expressed
> negative views of Islam and Muslims and who have cast suspicions about Muslims’
> activities are deemed culpable for Islamic terrorism. Further, Muslim Brotherhood
> front groups such as CAIR and ISNA issue veiled threats that the targeting and misrepresentation
> of Muslims will lead to distrust within Muslim communities and foster an unwillingness > to cooperate with authorities to strengthen homeland security.
> A related diversionary tactic is to blame jihadist acts on social or economic problems
> such as poverty, lack of opportunity, and bias against Muslims. In effect, the
> argument goes, Islamic terrorism is being manufactured by Islamophobia or poverty
> and has nothing to do with Islam. The West is blamed for its insensitivity to Islam,
> and the need for formalized measures or legislation is advanced to ensure that infidels
> aren’t harmed further by violent reactions when Muslims legitimately feel disrespected.
> Legislation such as the Istanbul Process, the collection of anti-blasphemy laws
> passed by the U.N., is presented as a necessary option under the guise of condemning
> insults to religion in general. Yet the real intent is to eliminate any criticism
> of Islam, as is made obvious by the regular and public condemnation of Christians
> and Jews by Muslims who populate the internet with videos calling for jihad against > infidels.
> Advancing false theories
> Another arrow in the quiver of Muslim tactics is to seize control of the education
> of military and government employees about Islamic doctrine. Muslim Brotherhood
> organizations do this by arguing that non-Muslims are unequipped to teach Islam
> and that it must properly be taught by Muslims. As a result, CAIR has provided
> Muslim sensitivity training for the FBI, U.S. Armed Forces, state and local law
> enforcement agencies, and others, all of it under the guise of fostering a “better
> relationship between law enforcement and the Muslim community.” Yet at the same
> time, the Brotherhood’s New York chapter distributed posters declaring, “Build
> a Wall of Resistance, Don’t Talk to the F.B.I.” and advised Muslims that they are > the victims of anti-Muslim bias.
> Incredibly, Muslim Brotherhood operatives, such as Louay Safi, have even taught
> the tenets of Islam to American troops deploying to Iraq and Afghanistan, including
> a course on the “Theology of Islam” at Fort Hood in Texas. Following Major Nidal
> Hasan’s 2009 attack on Fort Hood in which he murdered 13 people, Safi blamed the
> violent outburst on the “demonization of marginalized groups,” meaning Muslims.
> Another Muslim Brotherhood operative, Mohammed Magid, president of ISNA, was appointed
> in 2011 by Obama to serve at the Department of Homeland Security. His responsibilities
> have included the training and advising of personnel affiliated with the FBI and
> other government agencies. Magid has characterized any criticism of Islam as “religious
> bigotry and hate” and been responsible for purging government-training materials > critical of Islam.
> Monitoring news reports and media portrayals
> Managing the image of Muslims portrayed in the media is another aspect of the Islamic
> inside-influence operation to prevent accurate knowledge of the enemy. Threats
> of violence and boycotts and the brandishing of financial clout have been used against
> the media to alter the message about Islam, mute any potential criticism or negative > inference, and blunt attempts to educate the public about a very real threat.
> Media spin management is yet another aspect of the civilizational jihad that keeps
> non-Muslims in the dark about Islamic terrorist activities. The spin is managed
> by CAIR and other Muslim Brotherhood front organizations. For example, shortly
> after 9/11, Muslim leaders aggressively importuned the producers of the TV show
> 24, which portrayed terrorists as Muslims. They pressured Hollywood to change > the villains from Muslims to Neo-Nazis in the 2002 film The Sum of All Fears.
> During the 2005 Muslim riots in France, Prince Alwaleed Talal, the second-largest
> shareholder of Fox News, had photo captions changed from “Muslim riots” to “civil
> riots.” On-air personalities and guests have been labeled Islamophobic when they
> present accurate portrayals of Islamic terrorist activities and Islamic doctrine.
> Muslim Brotherhood operatives and their non-Muslim enablers have insisted that jihadist
> acts be described in ordinary criminal terms without any reference to the tenets
> of Islam. This serves to isolate jihadists and acts of jihad as a misunderstanding
> of the true nature of Islam when it is, in actuality, an integral part of Islamic > doctrine.
> When the bizarre and threatening post-9/11 antics of six imams on a U.S. Airways
> flight raised the suspicion of fellow travelers, CAIR successfully sued the airline
> and threatened to sue alert citizens for voicing their concerns. Since that time,
> CAIR has honed its skillful attacks to silence critics of Muslims and Islam from > all forms of dialogue and media.
> Portraying Islam as “a religion of peace”
> After 9/11, George W. Bush sent the tone for the national discussion on Islam by
> going to the Islamic Center of Washington six days later to reassure Americans.
> He declared in his stocking feet that the attack had nothing to do with Islam > because Islam is a “religion of peace.”
> Meanwhile, the language used to discuss Islam was sanitized in less than a decade
> following the deadliest attack on American soil. The 9/11 Commission Report released
> in 2004 mentioned “Islam” 322 times and “jihad” 126 times. By 2009, the Department
> of Homeland Security excluded accurate descriptions of the enemy and its actions,
> substituting “man-caused disasters” for “terrorist attacks” and “overseas contingency
> operations” for the Global War on Terror. The words “jihad,” “Islam,” and “Muslim
> Brotherhood” were eliminated from the FBI lexicon, as well as from the National > Intelligence Strategy of the U.S.
> Obama’s focus on nondescript “violent extremism” or “man-caused disasters” rather
> than “Islamic terrorism” has been applauded by U.S.-based Islamic advocacy groups
> such as the Muslim Public Affairs Council, whose leadership has justified the existence
> of Hezb’allah and Hamas, CAIR and ISNA. These groups insist, despite doctrinal
> evidence to the contrary and statements by jihadists, that their attacks are motivated > by Islamic jihad, that terrorism has nothing to do with Islam. > Results: ignorance and silence
> The shutting down of military and government training, the close monitoring of news
> reports and media portrayals, the advancing of false theories, the use of free speech-curtailing
> anti-blasphemy legislation, and the denial of jihadist terrorism as an integral
> part of Islam — “a religion of peace” — are all tactics used in the service of
> keeping infidels totally in the dark about the true nature of the civilizational > jihad well in place to defeat them.
> As apocryphal as crying wolf, false cries of blasphemy serve a sinister purpose
> — to shut down any and all productive dialogue on the true nature of the threat
> faced by the West. The goal is to ensure ignorance and induce complacency so that
> the supremacist, misogynist, discriminatory, and totalitarian nature of Islam is > not known and Muslims can triumph.
> A fitting quote by an intelligence analyst best sums up the situation:
> It is important to understand how effective this operation has been. I know of
> no one in the U.S. government who can speak out publicly or privately against Islamists,
> radical Islamists or militant Islamists. The operations targeting the National
> Defense University, the Joint Forces Staff College and the FBI has effectively censored
> everyone. You will NOT find any documentation censoring anyone and all the academic
> institutions will claim, and back up in writing, academic freedom, but, unfortunately,
> the message has already been sent – do not say anything unless it has been approved > by CAIR, MPAC and the other Muslim Brotherhood organizations.
> It’s evident that the Muslim Brotherhood’s General Strategic Plan for North America
> has achieved great success within the past few decades. Ultimately, the control
> of all knowledge of Islam and the civilizational jihad operation facilitates the
> attack against the West and effectively prevents any counter to Islamic expansionism.
> We are well on our way to being subdued by an enemy that has cleverly silenced > us.
> ITEM 9a: Adam Nossiter: Leader Ousted, Nation Is Now a Drug Haven http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/02/world/africa/guinea-bissau-after-coup-is-drug-trafficking-haven.html?ref=todayspaper
> [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=58psfelab.0.79m7lelab.wus7micab.3290&ts=S0837&p=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nytimes.com%2F2012%2F11%2F02%2Fworld%2Fafrica%2Fguinea-bissau-after-coup-is-drug-trafficking-haven.html%3Fref%3Dtodayspaper] > Published: November 1, 2012
> BISSAU, Guinea-Bissau – When the army ousted the president here just months before
> his term was to expire, a thirst for power by the officer corps did not fully explain
> the offensive. But a sizable increase in drug trafficking in this troubled country
> since the military took over has raised suspicions that the president’s sudden removal > was what amounted to a cocaine coup.
>
> The military brass here has long been associated with drug trafficking, but the
> coup last spring means soldiers now control the drug racket and the country itself,
> turning Guinea-Bissau in the eyes of some international counternarcotics experts > into a nation where illegal drugs are sanctioned at the top.
> “They are probably the worst narco-state that’s out there on the continent,” said
> a senior Drug Enforcement Administration official in Washington, who spoke on the
> condition of anonymity so as not to jeopardize his work in the region. “They are > a major problem.”
> Since the April 12 coup, more small twin-engine planes than ever are making the
> 1,600-mile Atlantic crossing from Latin America to the edge of Africa’s western
> bulge, landing in Guinea-Bissau’s fields, uninhabited islands and remote estuaries.
> There they unload their cargos of cocaine for transshipment north, experts say.
> The fact that the army has put in place a figurehead government and that military
> officers continue to call the shots behind the scenes only intensifies the problem.
> The political instability continued as soldiers attacked an army barracks on Oct.
> 21, apparently in an attempt to topple the government. A dissident army captain
> was arrested on an offshore island on Oct. 27 and accused of being the organizer
> of the countercoup attempt. Two critics of the government were also assaulted and > then left outside the capital.
> From April to July there were at least 20 landings in Guinea-Bissau of small planes
> that United Nations officials suspected were drug flights – traffic that could represent
> more than half the estimated annual cocaine volume for the region. The planes need
> to carry a one-and-a-half-ton cargo to make the trans-Atlantic trip viable, officials
> say. Europe, already the destination for about 50 tons of cocaine annually from
> West Africa, United Nations officials say, could be in for a far greater flood.
> Was the military coup itself a diversion for drug trafficking? Some experts point
> to signs that as the armed forces were seizing the presidency, taking over radio
> stations and arresting government officials, there was a flurry of drug activity
> on one of the islands of the Bijagós Archipelago, what amounted to a three-day offloading > of suspicious sacks.
> That surreptitious activity appears to have been simply a prelude.
> “There has clearly been an increase in Guinea-Bissau in the last several months,”
> said Pierre Lapaque, head of the regional United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime
> for West and Central Africa. “We are seeing more and more drugs regularly arriving > in this country.”
> Mr. Lapaque called the trafficking in Guinea-Bissau “a major worry” and an “open
> sore,” and, like others, suggested that it was no coincidence that trafficking > had spiked since the coup.
> Joaquin Gonzalez-Ducay, the European Union ambassador in Bissau, said: “As a country
> it is controlled by those who formed the coup d’état. They can do what they want > to do. Now they have free rein.”
> The senior D.E.A. official said, “People at the highest levels of the military are
> involved in the facilitation” of trafficking, and added: “In other African countries
> government officials are part of the problem. In Guinea-Bissau, it is the government > itself that is the problem.”
> United Nations officials agree. “The coup was perpetrated by people totally embedded
> in the drugs business,” said one official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity > because of the delicacy of the political environment here.
> The country’s former prosecutor general, Octávio Inocêncio Alves, said, “A lot of > the traffickers have direct relationships with the military.”
> The civilian government and the military leadership that sits watchfully in its
> headquarters in an old Portuguese fort at the other end of town reject the United > Nations drug accusations.
> “People say I’m a drug trafficker,” said Gen. Antonio Injai, the army chief of staff,
> raising his voice in an interview. “Anybody who has the proof, present it! We ask > the international community to give us the means to fight drugs.” > Connect With Us on Twitter
> Follow @nytimesworld for international breaking news and headlines. > Twitter List: Reporters and Editors
> Mr. Gonzalez-Ducay, the ambassador, responded, “I can’t believe that the one who > controls the drug trafficking is going to fight the drug trafficking.”
> Relaxed and wearing a colorful two-piece outfit and gold chains, General Injai sat
> under a giant kapok tree surrounded by uniformed aides. He laughed when asked whether
> he was the real power in Guinea-Bissau and blamed the deposed prime minister, Carlos > Gomes Jr., for provoking the coup through his military alliance with Angola.
> In 2010, the United States government explicitly linked the country’s military to
> the drug trade: the Treasury Department declared as drug kingpins both the ex-chief
> of the navy, Rear Adm. Bubo Na Tchuto, and the air force chief of staff, Ibraima
> Papa Camara, and froze whatever assets they may have had in the United States.
> Now, however, American officials are making overtures to the transitional government,
> despite other Western embassies’ hands-off approach to protest the military’s continued
> meddling in politics. General Injai expressed appreciation for the American position, > and called the United Nations special representative here a “bandito.”
> Russell Hanks, the American diplomat responsible for Guinea-Bissau, said: “You will
> only have an impact on this transition by engagement, not by isolation. These are
> the people who came in to pick up the pieces after the coup.” Mr. Hanks is based
> outside the country because the United States closed its embassy here during the > civil war in 1998.
> Officials point to several indicators, besides the increase in plane flights, to > show that Guinea-Bissau has become a major drug transit hub.
> They cite photographs of a recently well-cleared stretch of road in a remote rural
> area near the Senegal border, complete with turning space for small planes. The
> clearing was created under the supervision of military authorities, officials say.
> They also note mysterious absences of fuel at the tiny international airport in > the capital, presumed stolen by traffickers.
> Four months before the coup, a plane, with the aid of uniformed soldiers, landed
> in a rural area in the center of the country, which is the size of Belgium, said
> João Biague, head of the judicial police. The landing took place not far from General > Injai’s farm.
> Mr. Biague heads what is nominally the country’s antidrug agency, though he made
> it clear that he and his staff are largely powerless to practice any form of drug
> interdiction despite receiving frequent tips about small planes landing from abroad. > “The traffickers know we can’t do much,” he said.
> The agency is so starved of funds that he does not have money to put gas in its
> few vehicles, Mr. Biague said. Paint is peeling on the outside of the judicial police’s
> two-story colonial building downtown, and mold blackens the ground-floor pilasters. > It is allocated $85 a week from the country’s Justice Ministry.
> “The agents we have in the field want to give up because they have nothing to eat,” > Mr. Biague said.
> In the last three years, there have been more than a half-dozen unsolved political
> assassinations here, including of the longtime president and the former army chief
> of staff, as well as at least two coup attempts, besides the successful coup. Nobody > has been successfully prosecuted, though drugs were linked to many of them.
> Last month, the justice minister of the transitional government warned opposition
> politicians not to speak publicly of “cases that don’t concern them,” under threat > of criminal penalty.
> This week, the repression appeared to tighten. General Injai threatened journalists
> with death if they asked questions about the assassination of the former president,
> and he warned that there would be many arrests as a result of the countercoup attempt.
> There is remarkably little public talk of the unsolved political killings or of
> the country’s relations with the drug business. There have been no demonstrations; > no discussion in the Parliament, shut down since July; no news conferences.
> “A country that’s not capable of discussing its own problems – it’s not a country, > it’s not a state,” said Mr. Alves, the former prosecutor general.
> ITEM 10a: AP: Alleged Colombian Drug Lord Caught in Argentina http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204712904578090743636280224.html?mod=WSJ_World_LEFTSecondNews
> [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=58psfelab.0.69m7lelab.wus7micab.3290&ts=S0837&p=http%3A%2F%2Fonline.wsj.com%2Farticle%2FSB10001424052970204712904578090743636280224.html%3Fmod%3DWSJ_World_LEFTSecondNews] >
> October 31, 2012, 12:07 p.m. ET
>
> BUENOS AIRES-An alleged Colombian drug lord wanted in the United States has been > arrested in suburban Buenos Aires.
> Colombia’s President Juan Manuel Santos sent a Twitter message overnight crediting
> his country’s police and Argentine authorities for the capture of Henry de Jesús > López Londoño , also known as “Mi Sangre,” or “My Blood.”
> Mr. López is a former right-wing paramilitary figure wanted in Colombia and the > U.S. on charges of organized crime, drug trafficking and terrorism.
> He was tracked by a squad of Colombian police who came to Argentina. Argentine and > Colombian police planned to describe details of the operation later Wednesday. >
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ >
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